Individual Therapy

Individual Therapy or Psychotherapy involves meeting with a therapist one-on-one for the purpose of reducing internal suffering which occurs in the form of problematic behaviors, beliefs, feelings, and somatic responses (sensations in the body). In addition, ongoing psychotherapy is a common and useful means of self-growth and self-actualization. Therapy can help people to resolve barriers which interfere with positive qualities, such as joy, compassion, peace, self-esteem, spiritual connection, and love. Many people enjoy therapy and relish the journey of becoming more conscious about themselves, their inner world, and their relationships.



Psychotherapy can be useful for many interpersonal and intrapersonal problems: (Here you can find a list of common therapy issues). In general, modern psychotherapy is a personal process of deeply listening to, learning from, and working with the protective or wounded parts of oneself. Becoming conscious of one’s inner world and caring for oneself helps a person to heal, change, and grow.


Couples Therapy



Couples therapy, helps couples — married or not — understand and resolve conflicts and improve their relationship.  Couples therapy gives couples the tools to communicate better, negotiate differences, problem solve and even argue in a healthier way.

Couples therapy can be short term. You may need only a few sessions to help you weather a crisis. Or you may need couples therapy for several months, particularly if your relationship has greatly deteriorated. As with individual psychotherapy, you typically see a marriage counselor or therapist once a week.


Illness, infidelity, sex, anger, communication problems — all can contribute to distress in marriages or other relationships. Marriage counseling or couples counseling can help resolve conflicts and heal wounds.

Your partner comes home from work, makes a beeline for the liquor cabinet and then sulks off silently. You haven't had a real conversation for weeks. A few arguments over money or late nights out, sure, but no heart-to-hearts. Sex? What's that?

Your relationship is on the rocks, and you both know it. But you aren't sure how to fix things — or if you really want to.

It may be time for couples therapy or marriage counseling. Couples therapy can help you rebuild your relationship. Or decide that you'll both be better off if you split up. Either way, couples therapy can help you understand your relationship better and make well-thought-out decisions.


Group Therapy



Group psychotherapy is a special form of therapy in which a small number of people meet together under the guidance of a professionally trained therapist to help themselves and one another. The therapy has been widely used and has been a standard treatment option for over 50 years.

If you stop and think about it, each of us has been raised in group environments, either through our families, schools, organized activities, or work. These are the environments in which we grow and develop as human beings. Group psychotherapy is no different. It provides a place where you come together with others to share problems or concerns, to better understand your own situation, and to learn from and with each other.

Group therapy helps people learn about themselves and improve their interpersonal relationships. It addresses feelings of isolation, depression or anxiety. And it helps people make significant changes so they feel better about the quality of their lives. Additionally, group therapists can apply the principles of group to other settings and situations such as businesses, schools and community organizations.

Group works! In studies comparing group psychotherapy to individual therapy, group therapy has been shown to be as effective and sometimes even more effective. In cases of medical illness, there is substantial evidence that this form of therapy helps people cope better with their illness, enhances the quality of their lives and, in some cases, such as breast cancer, has even been shown to help people live longer.


The Group Therapy Session

The group therapy session is a collaborative effort in which the therapist assumes clinical responsibility for the group and its members. In a typical session, which lasts about 75-90 minutes, members work to express their own problems, feelings, ideas and reactions as freely and honestly as possible. Such exploration gives the group the important information needed to understand and help one another. Members learn not only to understand themselves and their own issues but also become "therapeutic helpers" for other members.



To make an appointment, contact:
Dr. Lenore Tate
(916) 428-0400 Office
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